Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

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Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

Ron Dow
John (Cook),
Some question regarding the date of your Chicago friends Dynacycle purchase. I bought my first Dynacycle from the Bike & Fixit Shop in Faribault Minnesota in February, 1950. Serial number 1010. It seems unlikely that only nine machines were sold from your 1949 Dynacycle acquisition and the one I bought. Any chance you have the serial number?
The D-165 had chrome 24" wheels and the large seat you mention. However, frame was not Schwinn and not available until late 1950. Always possible that Dynacycle offered these wheels and seat for separate purchase but not in 1949. The D-165 frame was constructed from heavier walled tubing but the OD of the frame tubes were the same as most all bikes manufactured during that era.
Bottom line: I don't have a clue as to what you had! I'll TRY to attach a picture of a 19511951 girls Schwinn Schwinn girls bike, blue and white. Is this even close to what you had?
Best regards,
Ron
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Re: Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

John T. Cook
Ron, thanks for  your reply. Remember, I was 13 at the time, I bought the cycle and was 14 when I sold it 8 months later. Mine looked nothing like the photo that you enclosed. Mine was a 24" bike and was all white with minor red and blue accents. Thinking back, I believe that the wheels were chrome, but had real heavy duty spokes.  The frame was very heavy duty, not like an ordinary bike.  There was no center tank, just a no frills bike.  It had no shocks, so when you got on a bumpy road, it was no fun. It had a large black seat with the handlebars straight in front.  When riding on a smooth surface, it had a real solid and sturdy feel. I kept the old title, which showed that the cycle was purchased in late 1949 by the original owner. However, when I went into the service, my parents threw away a lot of my old records and the title was one of them. I remember that the motor vibrated a lot and I had trouble keeping the gas tank secured, as the screw would keep coming out(way before lock tite). The tires were also heavy duty and not like your everyday bike. It had one handle bar brake grip, which helped a lot in stopping it.  My wife and I were looking through some old family photos and came across one of my later motorcycles and it got my memory to working. I have not thought of that Dynacycle for over 40 years.  In those days, we didn't take as many pictures as we do today and a 13 years old is not interested in taking pictures. I am going to look some more and also contact my sister as she got a lot of the old family photos and there may be a picture of it somewhere. It has really got my interest, as it did not look like any of the examples shown on the Forum. Maybe it was a prototype or a special edition and I am not sure now, if it was a Schwinn bike or not. There were a couple of other Dynacycle bikes in our town and one of them was a Schwinn and it looked like one of the Forum examples. This was in St. Petersburg, Florida, a real mecca for unusual bikes during the 50's, as well as cars. Mine was a female bike and I really liked it, because it was easy to get in and off the bike. I agree with you that the OD was the same on my bike frame, but made of heavier tubing.  Is it possible that there some of the D-165's were made in late 49, as I remember the original owner saying that it was the only Dynacycle bike that looked like this one for sale. Thanks for your reply and interest in preserving these unusual machines. Regard, John Cook**********
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Re: Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

Ron Dow
In reply to this post by Ron Dow
Four-stroke DynacycleJon,
Is there the remotest chance your Dynacycle was a four-stroke? They built at least one prototype with this design. I suspect manufacturing costs caused them to switch to the two-stoke engine. Funds were tight, production and sales were critical to keep the business afloat. The D-165 project was their swansong. Shortly after its introduction, Silvolite, supplier of the Dynacycle piston, cut off their supply for non-payment. No pistons, no engines, no sales.
Piston wear was exceptionally high and, more importantly, piston design was unsatisfactory for an air-cooled engine. Silvolite supplied pistons for water-cooled outboards such as Mercury and Wizard. Operating temperatures were significantly lower than in air-cooled applications. Probably a third of the Dynacycle engines I have rebuilt suffered from serious piston and cylinder damage due to the piston ring "anti-rotation pin" dislodging.  Pin scored the cylinder, gouged the piston, occasionally broke piston rings.
Dealers were unable to replace pistons in sold machines. No service, no sales, dealer reputation tarnished.

 
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Re: Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

john Cook
Ron, you may have hit on something. I knew that you would figure out this puzzle. After I sold the Dynacycle, I purchased a red Allstate 175cc Motorcycle and it was a two cycle and I mixed the oil and the gas. However, after jogging my memory,I now don't remember putting oil in the gasoline of the Dynacycle. Also, it had deep 4 cycle sound and not the high pitched noise of the two cycle or the smoke. As I said before, it did not look even close to anything that is posted on forum. Since,I was only 13 at the time, I really didn't know the real difference between a 2 and 4 cycle until I purchased the Allstate motorcycle. Now, I feel some regret having sold the bike or at least keeping the records, as it could have been one of a kind. Thanks for your help and research, as it has brought back some fond memories. If I find any pictures of the bike or records, I will let you know. I am going to contact my sister, as she remembers the bike and actually rode it a few times. John
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RE: Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

Ron Dow

I’d pay several thousand dollars for that machine! Don’t care about condition. Five of my Dynacycles are in a St. Louis museum. Can you imagine how excited they would be if the first article was made available?

I hot-rodded Dynacycles when parts were available, resumed the fun of performance when I started reproducing parts to replace those that failed when things were pushed too far. Best speed ever was 56 MPH with the cylinder ports “squared off”, compression raised, timing advanced, steel intake reed replaced with fiberglass, exhaust tuned, gear ratio changed and finally, adding propylene oxide to the fuel. With that in mind, your comment about your machine going 56 MPH would suggest it MAY be the lost four stroke.

 

From: john Cook [via Dynacycle] [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2015 9:40 PM
To: Ron Dow
Subject: Re: Interestng story at bottom of John Stansbury post

 

Ron, you may have hit on something. I knew that you would figure out this puzzle. After I sold the Dynacycle, I purchased a red Allstate 175cc Motorcycle and it was a two cycle and I mixed the oil and the gas. However, after jogging my memory,I now don't remember putting oil in the gasoline of the Dynacycle. Also, it had deep 4 cycle sound and not the high pitched noise of the two cycle or the smoke. As I said before, it did not look even close to anything that is posted on forum. Since,I was only 13 at the time, I really didn't know the real difference between a 2 and 4 cycle until I purchased the Allstate motorcycle. Now, I feel some regret having sold the bike or at least keeping the records, as it could have been one of a kind. Thanks for your help and research, as it has brought back some fond memories. If I find any pictures of the bike or records, I will let you know. I am going to contact my sister, as she remembers the bike and actually rode it a few times. John


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